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Talking Crime: McPherson woman launches podcast 

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By Jessie Wagoner

 

When it comes to true crime, McPherson resident Lindsay Conklin knows her stuff. In fact, she knows some oddly interesting facts about some famous and some not-so-famous true crime cases. Some would even call her a walking encyclopedia of crime knowledge. Obviously, a women with a penchant for talking and a desire to dig a little deeper into the lives and minds of criminals must do one thing: start a podcast. 

True crime has become one of the most popular genres for podcasts, giving listeners behind-the-scenes information about real-life cases. Many fans of true crime sas one of the most basic reasons why they enjoy true crime is because they want to know how and why crime happens. This, too, is why Conklin said her podcast stands out from some other true crime podcasts out there. 

“One thing I really want to focus on is how and why things happen. I like to dig a little deeper into the criminals’ lives, before they committed the crime, what were they like, what brought them to this point, not just the criminal event,” Conklin said. 

Episodes of “Crime Me a Criminal,” which are available for listeners on any podcast streaming service, include in-depth looks at crimes of the recent past as well as some cases that happened long before Conklin was even born. She recently had a 10-episode series devoted to 10 famous Kansas murders that will never be forgotten. Episodes included the Nancy Shoemaker murder in Wichita and the conviction of Rev. Tom Bird and Lorna Anderson in Emporia for the deaths of their spouses. Dennis Rader, known as BTK, was also included in the list, but Conklin would like to dig even deeper into his crimes, revealing she had an interaction with him just shortly before he was arrested. 

“I lived in Wichita at the time and was waiting tables at IHOP,” Conklin said. “One night, there was a guy at my table and I was just talking to him. He brought up BTK, and I commented it was scary he was active again, because you just never know who he could be. The guy said, ‘You never know; it could be that guy over there or that guy. I could be BTK.’ A few weeks later, David Rader was arrested and I saw his picture, and that was the guy from my table.”

Other episodes explore London Nursery Rhymes that are full of death, ruin and conflict—some fascinating children’s rhymes exploring horribly dark topics. 

“I’m always reading and researching and coming across interesting things to share with readers,” Conklin said. 

Conklin does all of her own research, writing, recording and editing of her podcasts. She manages to make multiple episodes while balancing the needs of her five daughters and husband. That means she can often be found reading and recording at odd hours of the night, sneaking in work when the house is quiet. 

In addition to the the podcasts, she also maintains social media for “Crime Me a Criminal,” keeping the Facebook page and Instagram page filled with images and information about episodes. 

“I try to share a lot of pictures on social media so people can put a face with the cases,” Conklin said. “Sometimes, with podcasts, you are listening and then wish you knew what a person looked like. So they can go to ‘Crime Me a Criminal’ on Instagram or Facebook and see images of the criminal, victims, documents, those types of things.” 

Now that Conklin is kicking off season two of the podcast, she is holding a giveaway for listeners. Up for grabs is some cool true crime swag, “Crime me a Criminal” materials and other fun goodies. 

“All the details for my giveaway are on the social media pages,” Conklin said. “I hope listeners participate, and I hope they enjoy the episodes I love hearing from listeners, and I reply to all my messages.” 

Conklin encourages listeners to join her as she explores the cold-blooded killers. Together you can learn who they were, what made them snap and where they are now.