Pine Village residents paint windows, doors for Easter holiday

By Randy Fogg

NEWS-LEDGER

MOUNDRIDGE–Painting was among the activities Pine Village residents were able to participate in as staff was finding things for them to do since the elder care facility was closed to all outside visitors due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

All residents were encouraged to help paint glass side doors and windows at the facility.

“We painted them for Easter,” Julie Brochtrup, director of marketing, said. “They’re really pretty.”

Staff taped off areas for the residents to apply the paint.

“They painted crosses on the windows,” Brochtrup added. “It made them look a lot like stained glass.”

On the doors to the wellness center, an Easter Bunny was painted, as well as a cross with a heart in the middle, Brochtrup said.

Besides painting, Brochtrup said staff has also planned other activities for residents. Since mid-March, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended nursing homes across the country do not allow any visitors.

“We’re finding a nice variety of activities to help get through it,” Brochtrup said. “The residents are troopers. They are handling things the best way they can.”

Residents have been able to play doorway bingo. Brochtrup explained residents stay in the doorway to their rooms as the game is played.

Another doorway activity has residents doing age-appropriate exercises.

“Everybody is able to stay six feet apart,” Brochtrup said of the doorway activities.

She noted residents and staff were following the social distancing guidelines.

Brochtrup said residents have also found a variety of ways to communicate with their family members.

Residents are able to use iPads to visit with family. Staff has also helped them to use Skype, FaceTime and Zoom to communicate.

“We’ve had family members come up to the windows and call their family member for a visit,” Brochtrup said.

She added residents have also received emails from family. Staff will then print off the email and give it to the resident to read.

“We’ve had a lot of communications with family,” Brochtrup said.